Bad Language On Menus

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This post touches on a very interesting topic.  The restaurant industry in the US does a good deal of business very easily. The traditional chain restaurant has evolved into high-end high-class fine-dining segment charging exoberant sums of money for food and beverage that are easily purchased by the patrons.  Dining in fine establishments has become a lifestyle that requires a healthy discretionary income.  What does this realm look like to the population?  Is it the TV commercials, glossy ads or what that depicts image of this lifestyle and its benefits? I would say "words" have a great deal with the reality created keeping this industry going.  Anyone who has worked in the fine dining restaurant industry knows the high percentage of the establishments which are bogus but do incredibly good business thanking their appearances.  What determines this image consistently and fools many people all of the times? I would say "words."  The restaurant industry has its own language created for the purposes of carefully presenting the products and services.  This language is simple to utilize and understand.  The result has been any person in the restaurant business finds the ability to create an appearance which maybe 100% false (as in case of the tourist-trap restaurants visited only once by clueless out-of-town tourists paying multiples of the true worth of restaurant goods often at inferior quality) but sells as 100% true unless otherwise proven and publicized to the average consumer.  The control of such language and even the banning of specific words and phrases maybe a giant step in the direction of protecting the ordinary consumer against the unethical food operators disguised as the best, the great, the "world famous?"

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from Grub Street by Aileen Gallagher

“Grilled to perfection” and “world famous” are two phrases that the Chicago Tribune would like to strike from menus, and MenuPages Chicago adds to the list: “We bristle at near-constant reminders of kitchen equipment (“wood-fired oven” should appear once on the menu, if at all).” What would you like to never see on a menu again? [Chicago Tribune via MenuPages Chicago]

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nymag/grubstreet/~3/orhpcX91xrQ/bad_language_on_menus.html

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